© UNICEF Malaysia/2013

Happy Mother’s
Month of MAY!

We cannot change the lives
of children alone!
We need YOU!​

For Every Child, Inclusion

In Malaysia, there are an estimated 440,000 children with disabilities. And 58 per cent of Malaysians surveyed feel underinformed about disability. Disabilities are divided into seven categories: hearing, learning, psychosocial, physical, speech, vision and multiple. Each category covers a huge variety of disabilities, some visible and some invisible.

Our main concerns for persons and children with disabilities are stigma and discrimination. At the moment in Malaysia, we do not have access to our rights, which prevents many of us from participating equally with persons and children without disabilities

WE SHARE, SO WE HELP

Zoe Gan, UNICEF Malaysia’s Disability Specialist

Zoe has been with UNICEF Malaysia since 2015, first as a consultant and now as
a Disability Specialist and Gender Focal Point. She also brings her expertise and experience to other offices with technical advice and capacity building, and as the Chair for the newly established UNICEF Global Network of Employees with Disabilities.

© UNICEF/Malaysia/2017/WillLim.
Photo taken during #ThisAbilityMakeathon
© UNICEF/Malaysia/2017/AndrewKoh.
Photo taken during BigBash

How UNICEF Is Bringing About A Change

At UNICEF, we provide technical advice and support to the government. This strategy allows us to systemically strengthen the systems that protect and serve all children, especially those most marginalized and at risk such as children with disabilities.

Help us help more children

We thank you for your continued support to UNICEF. Please continue to support our work with your donations.

Children with disabilities have the same needs, interests and rights as any other child. UNICEF works with key stakeholders by:

Identifying and addressing service gaps in service delivery

Mapping of key policies, programmes, interventions, and stakeholders in order to strengthen partnerships which address gaps in service provision.

Protecting against violence and discrimination

Advocating for attitude and behaviour change to end violence and discrimination against children with disabilities.

Promoting social inclusion

Encouraging service providers to champion inclusion for all children – with and without disabilities – via: awareness raising; meaningful engagement with children with disabilities; and public infrastructure improvements.

Increasing knowledge and understanding

Conducting studies, research and sharing sessions, bringing together key disability actors in the country to increase public knowledge, understanding and inclusion of children with disabilities.

@UNICEF/Malaysia/2020/JoyceChan

Going the extra mile
for children with disabilities

At the recent Parenting For Children with Disabilities Forum that was jointly organized by UNICEF and The National Population and Family Development Board under the Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development, parents of children with disabilities shared their invaluable insights on how we can work together to provide appropriate support for the children.

WE HEAR YOU

Voices of parents of children with disabilities ​

“With the deaf son, as we have different gender, there is a big challenge for me to explain to him about the gender issue. With the hearing daughter, in order to not letting her feel being neglected, I need to communicate with her a lot and try our best to accommodate her needs.

“UNICEF is doing it’s job to promote equal opportunities for people with disabilities, like organizing this parenting forum. It is a good chance for us to come and speak up, we have to take all these chances which help arouse public awareness on people with disabilities.”

Eamienor Zakiah Bt Mohd Zuki
– She and her husband are both hearing impaired. They have one hearing child and one child with hearing impairment.

“Parenting with children with disabilities is very challenging. We have to figure out how to honestly tell our child the reality. For example, my son said he wanted to walk. I couldn’t lie to him, and instead explained to him that ‘walking’ is from A to B, and that his powered wheelchair enables him.”

“We have to and love to join every forum and workshop for parenting with children with disabilities. It’s because we have to keep learning.”

Edmund Lim
– Father to a son with Spinal Muscular Atrophy, a group of genetic diseases

You can enable children with disabilities
to enjoy their rights of being SEEN, VALUED and INCLUDED.

© UNICEF 2020

See The Child,
Not The Disability

Children with disabilities have a right to be seen, valued and included. And they need to have policies and services that support their families and communities to care, nurture, and protect them.

THANK YOU FOR BEING WITH US! WE NEVER GIVE UP!

© UNICEF/UN0336462/Babajanyan VII Photo
Baby girl Ayedatujannah at 1 year old. She wears in a red floral pattern one-piece dress and stands on her own. She looks to her left-hand side with a radient smile. Photo credit: © UNICEF/UN0336462/Babajanyan VII Photo

WANT TO KNOW MORE?
Issue Brief: Children with Disabilities in Malaysia

In recognition of a rights-based approach to disability, this analysis briefly highlights key attitudinal, environmental and institutional barriers that can prevent children and adults with disabilities from actively participating in society and gaining access to their rights in Malaysia.

7,000 newborn babies die every day – the lives of 2.5 million newborns are cut short each year. Good midwives, affordable and quality health care, good nutrition and clean water can help save more newborn babies.

A survival gift of RM600 can provide 48 cans of therapeutic milk to treat severe malnutrition in infants and children. Help us save more babies! #EveryChildALIVE

Send two blessings with one click!

WANT TO KNOW MORE?
Issue Brief: Children with Disabilities in Malaysia

In recognition of a rights-based approach to disability, this analysis briefly highlights key attitudinal, environmental and institutional barriers that can prevent children and adults with disabilities from actively participating in society and gaining access to their rights in Malaysia.

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